Glam Slam: Stacy London's Truths About Style

I have known Stacy London for seven years now and can tell you she’s just like she is on TV — honest, upfront and very tell-it-like-it-is. Which is why we all love her so much!

So, I wouldn’t expect anything less than complete honestly from her in her new book “The Truth About Style.” She not only gives fashion tips, but also reveals the truths about her own life revealing many personal things including battling an eating disorder, being single (still!) and her fear of aging. Her candid book has already landed on the New York Times Best Sellers list (Go Stacy!) and we love that she is sharing “Five Truths About Style” with Glam Slam readers.

Truth: Style Is Not Fashion —
Style, unlike fashion, is personal. It’s about the individual. You have to know yourself in order to utilize style. Style isn’t selling you a false promise. It’s reality based, and operates on the knowledge of what is right for you. It’s always better to wear what works, what feels organic to you, than to force yourself into a current trend that simply feels wrong. Dress for yourself and what suits your lifestyle, and you will always look good. Style is about enhancing who you are, and not attempting to look like someone you’ll never be. Style can make you feel empowered, stronger, and cooler.

Truth: Style Ends with an E —
The “e” at the end of style is not for Ecstasy but for Emotion. Lots of people say they don’t know how to dress themselves. The usual culprit is fear, in many forms—of the unknown, of putting oneself out there, of being judged. Making excuses and letting fear rule our style stop us from expressing our true selves and what we could look like at our best. By changing your style, you’re forced to change the way you perceive yourself. And if you can see yourself differently, you can start to feel differently. If you put on clothes that actually flatter your figure, you suddenly may not feel as badly about your body anymore. Style can be as strong a motivator as a diet, exercise, and love to implement positive change in your whole life, not only the way you look.

Truth: A Style Rut Is a Symptom —
When you tell a woman who wears too much black to change to an animal print, it’s like putting a Band-Aid on a bullet hole. Coaxing her into a new top isn’t ultimately going to do much for her. But asking her “Why do you wear so much black?” opens a dialogue that will take you to a core issue. Wearing all black can enable you to hide in plain sight, just as overly sexy clothes can telegraph insecurity about what else the wearer has to offer, or her fear of aging, or a hunger for acceptance. It might make you “comfortable” to ignore your appearance, but the uncomfortable truth is that appearances do matter. Our clothes, like it or not, give other people insight into who we are. To take control of the message, you have to know yourself, and dress accordingly.

Truth: Style Is a Choice —
Taking control of one’s image is a relatively easy method when life is uncertain, unstable, and hard. If you can get into the habit of paying attention to your own image, you can begin to work with it instead of ; ignore them and you are halfway to nowhere. Consistently feeling good can help motivate you to keep on track with style. You can pay attention to the “how to” information if there is positive emotional reinforcement behind it. Caring about fashion can be vanity. Caring about style can be an opportunity.

Truth: Style Is Not a Privilege, It’s a Right —
Style is about creating possibility. It’s taking passionate, strategic control of your image—not just to dress for a job you may not even have known you were going to want but for oodles of other things you can’t predict for your future. Your appearance isn’t the only thing you’ll be judged by, and your deeds and words will always matter. But style is a large part of what we see in the mirror and how we feel about ourselves.

-- Ryan Patterson

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