John Mayer Apologizes For Racial Remark In Interview

John Mayer has apologized for using a racial slur in a new interview with Playboy, which hit the magazine’s Web site on Wednesday.

The rocker posted a message on his Twitter page midday, following the article’s release to backtrack after his use of the N word became public.

“Re: using the ‘N word’ in an interview: I am sorry that I used the word,” Mayer Tweeted. “And it’s such a shame that I did because the point I was trying to make was in the exact opposite spirit of the word itself. It was arrogant of me to think I could intellectualize using it, because I realize that there’s no intellectualizing a word that is so emotionally charged.”

The word came up after an interviewer asked Mayer, “If you didn’t know you, would you think you’re a douche bag?”

“It depends on what I picked up. My two biggest hits are ‘Your Body Is a Wonderland’ and ‘Daughters.’ If you think those songs are pandering, then you’ll think I’m a douche bag. It’s like I come on very strong. I am a very…I’m just very. V-E-R-Y. And if you can’t handle very, then I’m a douche bag. But I think the world needs a little very. That’s why black people love me,” he said.

When the writer asked him to explain the use of “very,” Mayer used the word.

“Someone asked me the other day, ‘What does it feel like now to have a hood pass?’ And by the way, it’s sort of a contradiction in terms, because if you really had a hood pass, you could call it a n**** pass,” he said, using the racial slur. “Why are you pulling a punch and calling it a hood pass if you really have a hood pass? But I said, “I can’t really have a hood pass. I’ve never walked into a restaurant, asked for a table and been told, ‘We’re full.’”

But the rockers use of the N word wasn’t the only comment that has raised eyebrows.

When asked if “black women throw themselves at you,” he replied with, “I don’t think I open myself to it. My d*** is sort of like a white supremacist. I’ve got a Benetton heart and a f*****’ David Duke c***. I’m going to start dating separately from my d***.”

Mayer went on to say he is attracted to a number of black women.

“I always thought Holly Robinson Peete was gorgeous. Every white dude loved Hilary from ‘The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air’. And Kerry Washington. She’s superhot, and she’s also white-girl crazy,” he said. “Kerry Washington would break your heart like a white girl. Just all of a sudden she’d be like, ‘Yeah, I sucked his d***. Whatever.’ And you’d be like, ‘What? We weren’t talking about that.’”

But Mayer continued Tweeting on Wednesday and promised not to use the word in the future.

“Again, because I don’t want anyone to think I’m equivocating: I should have never said the word and I will never say it again,” he wrote.

He also admitted using the word started a storm of controversy and it may result in a different way of addressing the media in the future.

“And while I’m using today for looking at myself under harsh light, I think it’s time to stop trying to be so raw in interviews,” he wrote. “It started as an attempt to not let the waves of criticism get to me, but it’s gotten out of hand and I’ve created somewhat of a monster… I wanted to be a blues guitar player. And a singer. And a songwriter. Not a shock jock. I don’t have the stomach for it.”

Mayer also used a gay slur during the interview when discussing his infamous kiss with celebrity blogger Perez Hilton on the last night of 2007.

“I remember seeing Perez Hilton flitting about this club and acting as though he had just invented homosexuality. All of a sudden I thought, I can outgay this guy right now. I grabbed him and gave him the dirtiest, tongue-iest kiss I have ever put on anybody—almost as if I hated f**s,” Mayer said using the F word.

He has not addressed the gay slur on his Twitter, but seemed to acknowledge the interview went farther than he expected.

“I just wanted to play the guitar for people. Everything else just sort of popped up and I improvised, and kept doubling down on it…. " he wrote on Wednesday afternoon.

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