Laverne Cox On Impact Of Her Time Magazine Cover

Laverne Cox On Impact Of Her Time Magazine Cover

“Orange Is the New Black” star Laverne Cox talks with Billy Bush and Kit Hoover on Access Hollywood Live about being the first transgender person to grace the cover of Time magazine. Does Laverne feel this is a turning point for acceptance of transgender people in America? Plus, what struggles did she face in childhood? And, Laverne shares what’s in store for her character in Season 2 of “Orange Is the New Black,” available now on Netflix.

Ellen: You're welcome, tayt. And I got you more stuff, too, okay? A bunch of dory stuff. Sunglasses. Don't put that on your head yet. I got you all kinds of things. I got you underwear. Look at that. Who doesn't want that? Yea! Ellen: And it's a picture of us. Look at that. All right, tayt. I'll see you soon, okay? We'll be right back. Ellen: You know our first guest from movies like "Reality bites" and "Before sun set." "Before midnight" is out on DVD today. Please take a look. I don't think so. The first one I felt connected to. I wasn't your first love. No. No. How old are you? Come on. 41. Ellen: Please welcome Ethan Hawke. I feel like we've met in passing somehow but I know that you have not been on this show and you somehow think you've been on this show. I think I have, but now that I hold this mug I feel like I definitely wasn't on the show. This mug is -- it's very pink. A lot of estrogen. Ellen: It's breast cancer awareness month. That's why. It's usually blue. You with know that, too, if you had been on the show. I feel convinced that I've been on the show, but now that I'm looking you in the eyes, I feel not. What do you think? Ellen: No. I know that for a fact. I feel like I've been here, but I think I've talked to you in my head and I've seen your show so much I feel like I've been on it. Ellen: Well, you haven't, but welcome. Am I here right now? Ellen: Yes. You won't remember this either, because you are only in town for a few hours. Right. I'm rehearsing Shakespeare's "Macbeth" and we have our first preview and then we'll start the long run. I'm out here today, doing a show of and then I fly back. Ellen: I'm glad that you are here and we get to say that you have been here. Do you think we'll remember this? Ellen: I will, but I think we've talked about it enough. Still something crazy happened to you on stage when you did theater, right? Where was this? The last time I was at Lincoln center, I was doing a play called "Coast of utopia." In "Macbeth" the story is that he kills a king and the actor playing Duncan, the last time I was on stage with him, he did die. He was playing my father and I asked him for some money in the play. He had to scream at me about what an idiot I was and he said, this is my final word and he fell down and had a severe heart attack and the audience is looking much like you are right now, gobsmacked. There was a doctor in the house. And one of the prop guys gave him -- Ellen: He had paddles? No. Ellen: Probably fake paddles. How come I can't think of that word? Ellen: C.p.r. That's different. Don't do it that way. No. I was thinking of the electric things. Ellen: That's why I didn't think that the prop people had real ones. Like fake ones and they're really trying to work on him. When the actor dropped, did they think it was part of -- You didn't say that very nicely -- when the actor dropped. Ellen: Well, he fell down and had a heart attack. When he dropped, did they think it was part of the play or did they think he had a heart attack? I think they all thought it was part of the theater. People could not believe that it was happening. Ellen: Exactly. I knew he was not supposed to drop. But he survived and lives to play again. Ellen: I guess that's what's fun about live theater. You can see someone drop. Are you -- you have four kids, right? I do. Ellen: How old are your kids? I have a 15-year-old daughter, 11-year-old son, 5-year-old daughter and 2-year-old daughter. Ellen: That's a lot of