Paris Hilton Released From Jail

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During their journey, other vehicles containing photographers shadowed the Hilton SUV, driving alongside it and filming from passenger and backseat windows. Other cars contained passersby who waved Hilton on.

The vehicle hit some traffic after changing to the 110 freeway northbound allowing those attempting to film the vehicle a better glimpse.

Hilton’s car then proceeded to the Westbound 10 freeway toward Hollywood.

At one point the car took a shortcut through a Hilton hotel in Beverly Hills.

At times during the journey, the car stopped in the street as it was surrounded by photographers on foot.

Hilton eventually made her way to her grandparents’ home in Los Angeles’ ritzy Holmby Hills area north of Sunset Boulevard.

After arriving at the mansion, just after 1AM Pacific, the heiress exited the SUV. She seemed to throw her hands up in the air for joy as aerial footage from KNBC showed. Paris then went and stood in front of the SUV headlights where she waited for her mother’s embrace. Not long after, the family went inside the home.

A short time later, Paris appeared at the back of the house with mom Kathy. The heiress then ran around the back lawn with her dog, while helicopters circled the area, shooting the scene.

In preparation for the media circus which accompanied her release, the Federal Aviation Administration promised to keep a close watch on the paparazzi helicopter pilots expected to track her every move.

“We will be sending inspectors to her neighborhood and to the jail to keep an eye on all the helicopter and perhaps even airplane traffic in the vicinity and make sure all the operations are conducted safely,” FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said Monday afternoon, noting that pilots could be cited for such things as hovering dangerously low over people or hovering low enough to kick up debris that damages homes and vehicles.

Meanwhile, in the fashionable Hollywood Hills neighborhood that Hilton calls home when she’s not in jail, city transportation officials put up temporary no-parking signs during the weekend to ensure that news vans and other vehicles didn’t block access to the narrow, winding street.

“It’s done to enable the people who live in the community to have access to their homes,” said Transportation Department spokesman Bruce Gillman. He didn’t know how long the signs would remain but said, “Hopefully, the media isn’t there too long.”

Upon Hilton’s release, sheriff’s spokesman Steve Whitmore said, “She fulfilled her debt. She was obviously in good spirits. She thanked people as she left.”

Hilton will complete her probation in March 2009 as long as she keeps her driver’s license current and doesn’t break any laws. She can reduce that time by 12 months if she does community service that could include a public-service announcement, the city attorney’s office has said.

While Paris’ rep Elliot Mintz declined to say what would be on his client’s immediate agenda upon her release, it appears food and philanthropy are two things she has her eye on.

“I will definitely get a good meal because the food in here is absolutely inedible and horrible,” the 26-year-old celebutante told E! News’ Ryan Seacrest by phone last week.

During the phone interview, she also revealed her humanitarian plans.

“I want to help build a transitional home so that when inmates leave here they don’t have to go back to the street,” she told Seacrest from jail. “These women just keep coming back because they have no place to go.”

Hilton is scheduled to appear on “Larry King Live” Wednesday night.

Paris’ problems began September 7, when she failed a sobriety test after police spotted her vehicle weaving down the street.

She pleaded no contest to alcohol-related reckless driving and was sentenced to probation for three years.

However, over the course of the next few months, she was stopped twice by officers who discovered her driving on a suspended license. The second stop landed her in court and then in jail.

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