Shia LaBeouf: I 'Dropped The Ball' On 'Indiana Jones' Sequel

Shia LaBeouf told the Los Angeles Times that he shares some of the blame for the failures of “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” – but he is also pointing the finger at the monkeys he was forced to swing through the jungle with.

“I feel like I dropped the ball on the legacy that people loved and cherished,” Shia told the Los Angeles Times’ 24 Frames blog when asked about the fourth “Indiana Jones” movie while in Cannes over the weekend. “You get to monkey-swinging and things like that and you can blame it on the writer and you can blame it on [director] Steven [Spielberg],” he continued. “But the actor’s job is to make it come alive and make it work, and I couldn’t do it. So that’s my fault. Simple.”

The actor went on to emphasize that he believes that modern audiences are hard to fool.

According to the Los Angeles Times, Shia is not the only “Indiana Jones” star who was less-than satisfied with the movie.

“We [Harrison Ford and Shia] had major discussions. He wasn’t happy with it either,” he also told the Los Angeles Times, referring to the movie the movie that grossed over $786 million worldwide. “Look, the movie could have been updated. There was a reason it wasn’t universally accepted… I’ll probably get a call. But he needs to hear this. I love him. I love Steven.”

Shia’s “Indiana Jones” comments come just days after he publicly criticized “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen.”

“When I saw the second movie, I wasn’t impressed with what we did,” he told the Associated Press on Thursday in Cannes when asked about the Michael Bay blockbuster. “There were some really wild stunts in it, but the heart was gone.”

He feels that the scope of the second “Transformers” movie hurt it.

“We got lost. We tried to get bigger. It’s what happens to sequels. It’s like, how do you top the first one? You’ve got to go bigger,” he continued. “Mike went so big that it became too big, and I think you lost the anchor of the movie. … You lost a bit of the relationships. Unless you have those relationships, then the movie doesn’t matter. Then it’s just a bunch of robots fighting each other.”

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