Winter Olympics: Power Foods For An Olympian Diet

Winter Olympics: Power Foods For An Olympian Diet

Good nutrition is key for Olympic athletes’ diets and this month’s Health Magazine reveals power foods that help them go for the gold. Contributing Health Magazine editor Cynthia Sass joins Billy Bush and Kit Hoover on Access Hollywood Live to share the foods that fuel Olympians.

The world's greatest athletes take center stage. The games begin today in sochi. Similar to us regular folks, good nutrition is key. This month, we reveal the power foods in their diets that should be in ours. Cynthia. We're going to take a look at some of the diet nutrition plans. We don't burn as many calories as they do. Right. Tell us about if we can. Yes, we can eat smaller portions, but can certainly eat the same foods and just feel good and have energy right? Fantastic. First up, a ski jumper, we've talked to these athletes, what do you eat. We're all curious about this, right? They're all focused on good nutrition because they know it helps them have more energy. We used to hear about Michael self, like five, 6,000 calories a day. She starts her day with cereal, a banana and greet yogurt. It has two to three times more protein than regular yogurt. And then of course we know bananas are loaded with potassium. So this is a great breakfast for anyone. A little more Greek yogurt and you're there. Julie in ice hockey. One of the things that she told us is that at the end of training, without question, she always has a shake within 30 minutes. That's definitely something we recommend because it helps the recovery process. Her favorite is bananas and whey protein and cinnamon. Cinnamon actually helps to boost mental performance. Wait. If he could remember his credentials when he goes to Russia. It also is loaded with ante objection dants. It has as much as a half a cup of blue we Aries. It's good for circulation. Yeah, it is. Erin, her sport is luge. She says she always keeps energy bars in her bag. She said, even when they're smushed up, they still taste good. Two of the ingredients that are really key are oaths anden -- oats and honey. You get this time-released energy to your muscles. And then honey has been shown to boost power when eaten before activity. Let's finish up with Hillary knight. Yeah, she makes her own trail mix. First of all, it tastes fantastic, but tart cherries are very good pain relievers. They help you reduce the loss of strength after a strenuous work outand have pain relieving substances. It helps the body open up circulation so you have better energy to all of your cells. And with Valentine's day just around the corner, got to get that ancillary benefit. And it's so salty. It's good if you make it yourself. Put it in a baggy. This january-february issue is on newsstands right now.